Cheap graphics card deals this week

When you’re building a gaming PC, finding a cheap graphics card deal can make or break your budget. Big graphics card price drops don’t happen all that often, and when they do, it’s usually because something shiny and new is coming out. And when there is a rare cheap graphics card deal, it may sell out quickly. We know the graphics card can easily be the most expensive component in your PC, which is why we’re keeping our eye out for the best deals we can find every week.

The money you save with a cheap but powerful graphics card can go towards a the best CPU instead, or an awesome gaming keyboard and mouse. Or you can splurge on a higher-end GPU than you’d planned on by finding a deal that cuts its price down a notch.

If you’re not quite sure what kind of graphics card you want, before surveying the cheap graphics card deals below, consult our GPU hierarchy and guide to the best graphics cards for PC gaming.

Nvidia’s GeForce RTX 2080 Ti is the latest and most potent GPU around, and it’s also one of the largest consumer GPUs ever produced. The Turing TU102 is 60 percent larger than the Pascal GP102 in the 1080 Ti, with 55 percent more transistors. Those extra transistors went into more CUDA cores, but Nvidia didn’t stop there, adding in Tensor cores to help accelerate deep learning algorithms like DLSS, plus RT cores to accelerate ray tracing.

There are plenty of other enhancements in the Turing architecture as well, but if you want the best, be prepared to shell out: the cheapest 2080 Ti cards start at $999, with many selling for $1,199 and up. Technically there’s also the Titan RTX, which more than doubles the price of the 2080 Ti, but it’s more of a prosumer card that anything we’d recommend for pure gaming purposes.

If you’re looking for the best value, forget about the new RTX cards. On the other hand, if you’re eyeing a 4k 144Hz HDR G-Sync display and you want the absolute fastest graphics card around, this is the card for you. You could even try adding a second card and using an NVLink connector, assuming you just won the lottery. (Note that the current ray tracing enabled games do not support multi-GPU with DXR (DirectX Raytracing) enabled, so we don’t recommend this!) We’re unlikely to see anything substantially faster for at least a year, so you’ll be able to sit comfortably at the top of the pecking order for a while.

The biggest issue with DXR and RTX hardware right now is that lack of games, although this problem is getting less and less significant. There were a few major games when these cards first launched (Battlefield 5, Assetto Corsa Competezione, Metro Exodus, and Shadow of the Tomb Raider), plus a few tech demos (Quake 2 with RT) and some overseas titles (Justice). But with Unreal Engine and Unity both supporting DXR, we should start seeing more ray tracing games later this year, and early next – Cyberpunk 2077 and the Call of Duty reboot have already announced they’ll support ray tracing, with Control, Wolfenstein: Youngblood, recently adding it for their launches.

While nowhere near the top of our list for power, this is a superb value pick if you’re looking for performance on a budget. AMD’s Polaris architecture has been around a few years, and while it’s beginning to show its age, it’s also significantly cheaper now than when it launched. It’s an excellent card to tackle the current 1080p era of gaming, and if you’re still leaning on integrated graphics or an older card, it’s a cheap upgrade.

Overall, the RX 570 4GB typically comes out slightly ahead of the GTX 1650 4GB. It does draw more power than Nvidia’s Turing-in-a-GTX-shell 16-series of cards and the 1060, but it can also regularly be had for $30-40 less than either of Nvidia’s closer competitors.

Most desktops are more than capable of running this 150W card without any difficulty, though you’ll need at least a 6-pin power connector, or possibly an 8-pin connector. Sales routinely drop the price of RX 570 4GB cards to $110-$120, so as long as your PSU is up to snuff, the RX 570 pretty much kills off the market for anything lower. If you’re building a budget PC or upgrading from an older, outdated GPU, the RX 570 is a great starting point.

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